[ REVIEW ]

 
       
     
 
   
 
 

Ratcatcher (1999) (蹾 ˹ѧ 3ͧ)

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Directer:Lynne Ramsay  Producer:Gavin Emerson Writter:Lynne Ramsay  

Music:Rachel Portman  Cinematography:Alwin H. Kuchler   Editor:Lucia Zucchetti  

Running time:94 min Country:UK  Language:English  Genre:Drama Subtitle: English
Starring:

William Eadie … James Gillespie
Tommy Flanagan … George Gillespie
Mandy Matthews … Anne Gillespie
Michelle Stewart … Ellen Gillespie
Lynne Ramsay Jr. … Anne Marie Gillespie
Leanne Mullen … Margaret Anne

 

   

 

˹ѧҧ:

 


ҧ:11 wins & 4 nominations

BAFTA Awards
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2000 Won Carl Foreman Award for the Most Promising Newcomer Lynne Ramsay
Nominated Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film Gavin Emerson
Lynne Ramsay
 
Bordeaux International Festival of Women in Cinema
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
1999 Won Golden Wave Best Film (Meilleur Film)
Lynne Ramsay
 
Bratislava International Film Festival
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2000 Won Best Actress Mandy Matthews
Grand Prix Lynne Ramsay
 
British Film Institute Awards
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
1999 Won Sutherland Trophy Lynne Ramsay
 
British Independent Film Awards
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
1999 Won Douglas Hickox Award Lynne Ramsay
Nominated British Independent Film Award Best Newcomer
Alwin H. Kuchler
Best Original Screenplay
Lynne Ramsay
 
Chicago International Film Festival
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
1999 Won Silver Hugo Best Director
Lynne Ramsay
 
Edinburgh International Film Festival
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
1999 Won New Director''s Award Lynne Ramsay
 
Ghent International Film Festival
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
1999 Won Georges Delerue Prize Rachel Portman
Nominated Grand Prix Lynne Ramsay
 
London Critics Circle Film Awards
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2000 Won ALFS Award British Director of the Year
Lynne Ramsay
 
Riga International Film Forum ''Arsenals''
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2000 Won FIPRESCI Prize International Competition
Lynne Ramsay
For a fresh and truthful debut showing how a young boy''s soul matures in a harsh world.
 

 

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Ratcatcher is a 1999 film written and directed by Lynne Ramsay. It is her debut feature film and was screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival.

The film won its director numerous awards including the Carl Foreman Award for Newcomer in British Film at the BAFTA Awards, the Sutherland Trophy at the London Film Festival and the Silver Hugo for Best Director at the Chicago International Film Festival.

“Utilizing beautiful, elusive imagery, candid performances, and unexpected humor, Ratcatcher deftly contrasts urban decay with a rich interior landscape of hope and perseverance, resulting in a work at once raw and deeply poetic”.

Ratcatcher never received a wide cinematic release. It was released on DVD by the Criterion Collection.
 



Ratcatcher is set in Glasgow, 1973. The city, despite its Victorian grandeur, has some schemes with the poorest housing conditions in western Europe, such as no running hot water, no bathing facilities and no indoor toilet. The city is mid-way through a major re-development program, demolishing these schemes and re-housing the tenants in new modern estates. The problems in these schemes are somewhat compounded by the binmen going on strike, creating an additional health hazard and a breeding ground for rats. The main character, James, is a 12-year old boy, growing up in one of these schemes, which is gradually emptying, as the re-housed tenants move out. James, with the rest of his family, patiently waits to be re-housed. The film opens with James possibly contributing to the death of his pal, Ryan, by failing to raise the alarm when Ryan fails to surface after the two boys have a tussle in the local canal. James leaves the scene, unsure, and apparently unseen. This event comes back to haunt him at critical points in the film. The film follows the sensitive James as he tries to come to terms with his guilt, make sense of the insensitive aspects of his environment, from his heavy-drinking father to the local peer culture, and as, one by one, his hopes of a brighter future appear to be dashed.
 


A very powerful movie which will stick with you for a long time
by Andrew Wills (Brighton, England)

I saw this movie recently at a special Student premiere in Leicester Square in London. I''d read a few reviews from various magazines about the movie and its lack of Narrative structure, but from watching the first 5 minutes, I knew this was something special. This has to be one of the most powerful British Movies ever made. The acting is superb, the whole cast is brilliant especially the children. Lynn Ramsey directs her feature debut with confidence and professional ability, and the result is stunning. The Narrative does give way slightly after the "accident" and the movie seems to forget about that fateful day on the canal, it seems to drift a little, but this, as I found out afterwards was on purpose. The movie was originally envisaged as 20 short stories which came into one, and it was also designed so the audience would always have this event in the back of their minds throughout the movie and whenever something relevant happened you were instantly reminded of it. Their are a few minor controversial scenes in the movie which some members of the audience did not agree with and others simply laughed off - I was not bothered about the main controversial scene but could see and hear that some people were offended. The setting of Glasgow in the late 1970s is well represented, and set around the dustbin men strike of ''76. The atmosphere of living in a disease ridden place like this with rubbish piling up on every corner is almost tangible. The balance between bleakness and humour is never crossed too far either side. The subject matter is very depressing and humour was therefore injected in places (such as the rat on the moon sequence) to lighten up the audience and not have them leaving the cinema depressed.

This movie is a real stunner, don''t be fooled by reviews and magazines saying otherwise go and see this movie at the first possible chance. You will not be disappointed.

 


SYNOPSIS: In her breathtaking and assured debut feature, Lynne Ramsay creates a haunting evocation of a troubled Glasgow childhood. Set during Scotland’s national garbage strike of the mid-1970s, Ratcatcher explores the experiences of a poor adolescent boy as he struggles to reconcile his dreams and his guilt with the abjection that surrounds him. Utilizing beautiful, elusive imagery, candid performances, and unexpected humor, Ratcatcher deftly contrasts urban decay with a rich interior landscape of hope and perseverance, resulting in a work at once raw and deeply poetic.


 

 

 





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