[ REVIEW ]

INDY MOVIE REVIEW
 
Hide & Seek (2014)
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Director:Joanna Coates Producer:Daniel Metz Screenplay by:Daniel Metz, Joanna Coates Cinematography:Ben Hecking   

Edited by:Maya Maffioli Running time:82 min Country:UK, USA Language:English Genre:Drama, Romance  Subtitle:English  Starring: Josh O''Connor ... Max, Hannah Arterton ... Charlotte, Rea Mole ... Leah, Daniel Metz ... Jack, Joe Banks ... Simon

 
 
     4 ˹ǼԴѧ ź˹ըҡLondon Եѹ㹪 ԹᴹشԷԴἡҡẺἹŸͧѧ ҧäš㹨Թҡҧ觾 Ҿ¹쪹ҧ Michael Powell Award Edinburgh International Film Festival

     Joanna Coates’ HIDE AND SEEK is a story of young people now - full of excitement, frustration, lust, and sadness. The film follows four young people who flee from London and set up in a polyamorous commune in the country, choosing total isolation as a form of emotional, intellectual, and political hiding place. Strange rules and rituals help to loosen their inhibitions as, fighting cynicism and ghosts from the past, they move towards a deeply unconventional joy.
     HIDE AND SEEK puts forward the controversial idea of retreat as protest; the characters hope to find a new spiritual and sexual truth rather than accepting other generation’s morals. Using a stately, meditative tone to temper or increase the provocation, the film uncovers a new way to express feelings of loneliness, kinship, fear and joy.


Hide and Seek (released as Amorous in the United States) is a 2014 British-American romantic drama film, directed by Joanna Coates
 and co-written by Coates and Daniel Metz.

The film won the Michael Powell Award at the Edinburgh International Film Festival.

In an isolated English cottage, four young people from London move in together, seeking to challenge social conventions and their own tolerances by engaging in scheduled partner-swapping.

As their inhibitions and past traumas fade, they achieve a unique kind of collective happiness but the durability of their new living arrangement is tested by the arrival of an outsider who fails to get in tune with the foursome''s radical spirit.

An inventive and engaging film that uses an elegant, delicate style to gently probe both the protagonists'' ideals and our own convictions about love and sex.

A genuinely radical take on current woes and wishes, Hide And Seek takes the glooms of today and transforms them into a beguiling and provocative modern fable.


˹ѧҧ:

(ԡٻʹٻ˭ ʡ͡պ١ʹٻ) 

ҧ:1 win & 1 nomination.

 

 

East End Film Festival, UK 2014

Nominated
Accession Award Best Cinematography
Ben Hecking 
 

Edinburgh International Film Festival 2014

Won
The Michael Powell Award for Best British Feature Film
Joanna Coates 

Goes to a feature we found very innovative in form and in which all those involved, from the ... More


 
 

East End Festival British Film Review: ''Hide and Seek''

     Beautifully shot if a little vague to begin with, there''s a wonderful indulgence to the simple wholesome lifestyle that is portrayed in Hide and Seek. Days are spent in a playful romp of art, dance, acting and wind ups, as four young people take the decision to set up home together in a lonely cottage in the English countryside. We get the impression that to begin with they are strangers, and are escaping from the sometimes overwhelming stress that comes with just being alive - relationships, family, guilt, work, success. The four develop a polyamorous relationship and from the beginning there is a rota for sharing the one bed. This detail puzzled me as the cottage is the holiday home of Rea Mole''s character - she mentions her parents (plural), so I wonder where she slept as a child.
     Whilst the film is fairly slow to get going, with details of the backstory hinted at, just enough information is dripped through the script that it becomes gripping fairly soon. Joanna Coates'' handling of the unusual story keeps the pace compelling; the snippets of information that are revealed are complimented by sensitive subtle acting from the four main characters played by Hannah Arterton, Josh O Connor, Rea Mole and Daniel Metz, who also produced the film.
     Visually the film is poetic and honest - there''s a sense of being in a grown up Enid Blyton story, but one that cuts life down to the essentials needed to stay sane and healthy. The unconventional lifestyle depicted would raise eyebrows in the suburbs but actually seems far more nourishing than the ones they''re running away from. The film luxuriates in dappled sunlight, grassy meadows and daydreams - the focus is very much the good things in life. Hide and Seek lives up to its name - it is breezy and playful but whilst enough is revealed to engage us, there is a significant amount left to the imagination. It is a sunny observation about priorities and life choices, and it might leave you reflecting on your own priorities in life.


User Reviews :

A triumph of artistry

12 January 2016 | by Etienne King (Montreal, Canada)
     Joanna Coate''s Hide and Seek is an ode to beauty. Grace is everywhere, whether it be in the cinematography, the story, the characters or the actors. The same way the characters in the film defy society by creating their own little utopia, the film generally defies our expectations regarding modern cinema. Coates has done away with the conventional plot. There is no beginning, no middle, no end to the story. She has done away with the socially-dictated faultless images of the body. Beauty in this movie can be found as much in its perfection as a unique picture, as in its deliberate imperfection. Constructed around the central themes of nature, boundaries of intimacy, social non-conformism and freedom, Hide and Seek will leave you reflective. In our busy lives, few are the times we allow ourselves to escape reality and question things society has taught us to internalize. Could we be capable of undertaking the protagonists'' journey? Would we be willing? What do we owe society that we shouldn''t just seek to create our own utopias?
     These are some pretty profound questions, yet there is something to be said about the softness of the film. A plot so uncomplicated, a setting so peaceful and stripped of business, the fact that most of the scenes happen in a small perimeter in and around the same house make for a pure, distilled, easy to watch film.  Hide and Seek is a triumph of artistry in that it glistens beauty through simplicity, and perfection through difference.







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