[ REVIEW ]

INDY MOVIE REVIEW
 
Tepenin Ardi (2012)
 (บรรยายอังกฤษ) 
 
   
 

Director:Emin Alper Producer:Emin Alper, Enis Kostepen, Seyfi Teoman Screenplay by:Emin Alper Music by:Volkan Akmehmet Cinematography:George Chiper  Edited by:Ozcan Vardar Running time:94 min Country:Turkey, Greece Language:Turkish Genre:Drama  Subtitle:English  Starring: Tamer Levent ... Faik, Reha Özcan ... Nusret, Mehmet Özgür ... Mehmet,
Berk Hakman ... Zafer
, Banu Fotocan ... Meryem

 
 

หนังตัวอย่าง:

(ԡٻʹٻ˭ ʡ͡պ١ʹٻ) 

รางวัล:25 wins & 6 nominations.

 

 

Abu Dhabi Film Festival 2012

Nominated
Black Pearl Award
New Horizons Competition
Emin Alper 
 

Ankara International Film Festival 2013

Won
Academia Jury Award
Emin Alper 
Won
Best Actor
National Competition
Tamer Levent 
Won
Best Director
National Competition
Emin Alper 
Won
Best Film
National Competition
Emin Alper 
Won
Best Screenplay
National Competition
Emin Alper 
Won
Best Supporting Actor
Mehmet Özgür 
Won
Best Supporting Actress
Banu Fotocan 
 

Asia Pacific Screen Awards 2012

Won
Asia Pacific Screen Award
Best Film
Enis Kostepen 
Seyfi Teoman 
Emin Alper 
Nikos Moutselos 
Best Screenplay
Emin Alper 
Nominated
Asia Pacific Screen Award
Best Performance by an Actor
Tamer Levent 
 

Berlin International Film Festival 2012

Won
Caligari Film Award
Emin Alper 
Won
First Movie Award - Special Mention
Forum
Emin Alper 
 

Cinefan - Festival of Asian and Arab Cinema 2012

Won
First Feature Competition Award
Emin Alper (director) 
Bulut Film (production company) 
Two Thirty Five (co-production) 
 

Ghent International Film Festival 2012

Nominated
Grand Prix
Best Film
 

International Cinephile Society Awards 2013

Won
ICS Award
Best Picture Not Released in 2012
 

Istanbul International Film Festival 2012

Won
FIPRESCI Prize
National Competition
Emin Alper 
 
Won
Golden Tulip
National Competition / Best Turkish Film Of The Year
Emin Alper 
Bulut Film 
2/35 
Best Screenplay
Emin Alper 
 

Karlovy Vary International Film Festival 2012

Won
Netpac Award
Emin Alper 
 

MUFF Malatya International Film Festival 2012

Won
Crystal Apricot Award
Best Film
Emin Alper 
Best Screenplay
Emin Alper 
 

Palic Film Festival 2012

Won
Golden Tower
Best Film
Emin Alper (director) 
Bulut Film (production company) 
Two Thirty Five (co-production) 
 

Paris Cinema 2012

Nominated
Jury Award
Best Feature Film
Emin Alper (director) 
 

Sarajevo Film Festival 2012

Won
Special Jury Prize
Feature Film
Emin Alper 
 

SIYAD Turkish Film Critics Association Award 2012

Won
Turkish Cinema Awards
Best Film
Emin Alper 
Best Screenplay
Emin Alper 
Best Supporting Actor
Mehmet Özgür 
 

Taipei Film Festival 2012

Won
International New Talent Competition
Special Jury Prize
Emin Alper (director) 
Bulut Film (production company) 
Two Thirty Five (co-production) 
Nominated
International New Talent Competition - Grand Prize
Emin Alper 
 

Tribeca Film Festival 2012

Nominated
Jury Award
Best Narrative Feature
Emin Alper 
 
 

When some people from the other side of the mountain invade the territory of a farming family, the family head tries to unite the family and fight back. But then problems within the family start to appear as well.

Finely wrought and acted psychological drama cleverly plays on the repressed violence and projections of a Turkish family on holiday.

First-time director Emin Alper makes his debut with an unsettling Turkish drama centered on a family reunited on holiday.
Beyond the Hill, an unsettling drama set in the Turkish wilderness, plays on the something out there fears of a small family clan united for a summer holiday. With all the action taking place off-camera, the classic horror elements give way to a highly controlled psychological drama that veers into social parable. The glancing, off-key approach chosen by first-time director Emin Alper makes the skin crawl almost from first shot to last but will also limit the films audience to art house tribes willing to make some mental effort to fill in plot points Alpers script only suggests.

The influence of director Nuri Bilge Ceylan seems to be rampant in Turkish festival films, and this is one of his more successful heirs. There is the same attention to a realistic setting, psychological detail and Chekhovian interest in delving into the soul of the common man. All the important things are never said, only hinted at, and the distracted viewer can miss the whole point of the film very easily.

Mr. Faik (Tamer Levent) is a proud old-time farmer very attached to his land, which stretches over a remote canyon covered with ancient stone caves and woods. Lately, a band of nomads (never seen) have been grazing their goats without permission, and Faik and his hulking helper Mehmet (Mehmet Ozgur) have stolen a goat in revenge. When Faiks son Nusret (Reha Ozcan) comes to visit with his two sons, the goat is butchered for dinner and the countdown is on to a full-fledged blood feud.

Yet the basis of hostilities is not what it seems, because almost everything that happens in the film occurs in the minds of the characters, described with quiet nuance by an excellent cast. Nusrets older son Zafer (Berk Hakman), a handsome young man of soldiering age, is subject to severe hallucinations and continually imagines he sees a group of comrades in camouflage gear urging him to join them. His bored teenage brother Caner plays with grandpas rifle too carelessly, especially around the wild boy Sulu and his ferocious dog. And after drinking too much raki, the lonely widower Nusret gets overly friendly with Mehmets wife. The screenplay shifts from character to character as they go their separate ways, creating havoc off-screen before reuniting guiltily around a campfire.

As the film rolls into its second half, it begins to feel too drawn out, like much smoke without fire, and the tension starts to drain away. Only toward the end do three escalating acts of violence precipitate the startling climax, accompanied by an unexpected drum march that turns the ever-present atmosphere of danger into one of plain human folly.

Camerawork shows a lot of finesse in building a menacing atmosphere with simple point of view shots, or just by following the back of an unidentified head as someone stalks through the woods. The films dense psychological background and low-key approach raise it above horror schlock, however, aided by a natural landscape that is quite eerie in itself.


REVIEW:
Suspiciousness against imaginative enemies

10/10
Author: Sunshine everywhere biscotoloukoumo from Greece
14 September 2014
The film is technically a masterpiece. The long periods of silence succeeding natural sounds incorporate the viewer into the scenery and the atmosphere.

The key to the comprehension of the movie is the closeted parallel of this archaic in manners Turkish family with the modern state. What prevails is suspiciousness against imaginative external enemies as well as hidden guilt between the members of the inner family. The outcome is quite tragicomic and indicative of the obsessions and artificial dead ends which point at the "foreign" as the source of all our woes.

I also underlined the scene where the little girl with all its innocence states that we are also nomads, so "these" nomads won''t do us any harm. The mature man replies that "they are bad nomads" and so differ from the morally immaculate family.

Moral tale

9/10
Author: kosmasp
30 April 2012
I was lucky enough to catch this at this years International Berlin Festival. The director was realistic about the eventual outcome of the movie I suppose, but still the fact he made this movie is something that should be celebrated. It''s a really remarkable movie, with standout performances by the cast. And while it does revolve around violence, none is actually really shown.

Which makes the whole thing even more intriguing and more arresting at the same time. Human interactions are the main course, with our instincts, drives and fears being dissected very slowly and for all to see. You can see things coming, but it seems to be impossible to stop them. It''s in our nature. While this is a pessimistic view of things (or at least my interpretation of it), this is an amazing movie, that I cannot recommend highly enough!

What is really behind the hill?

10/10
Author: Gorkem Gulan from Amsterdam
30 September 2012
I was very fortunate that EYE Film Museum Amsterdam ran this movie during the Turkish Beat festival. Must say that I really really loved this movie. It is the sort of movie keeps you thinking within a couple days after you watch it. And I''m not talking gets you thinking out of not understanding the story but more like wanting to really know what is really "behind the hill".

The story take place in a remote village in East of Turkey where a family with complicated internal relationships constantly struggle with the villagers on the other side of the hill. You never see them but you only see their actions- or the actions that are attributed to them. From the start to the end, it''s all wrapped with tensions of the unknown and how the villagers find ways to deal with them.

I do want to write so much more but I hate the spoiler reviews so I will leave it at this. For all I know, I still am not sure what was behind the hill.

Gorkem

A Master Class in Film Making

9/10
Author: corrosion-2 from United Arab Emirates
21 October 2012
Emin Alper''s Beyond the Hill is a master class in film making and in particular the use of sound in movies. With a soundtrack composed of only natural sounds found in nature and without any music (except at the very last scene) Alper manages to build unbearable tension.

A small landowner has punished some people living beyond a hill whose goats were grazing in his land by taking one of their goats and killing it to make a feast for his son and grand sons who are visiting him. Will those people now take revenge and what form would that be? From the moment the landowner''s family arrive Alper builds up the tension expertly and manages to maintain this tension throughout the film.

In the Q&A after the screening Alper confirmed that his film is a political allegory about Turkey and its neighbors. In parts it is reminiscent of Once Upon a Time in Anatolia and clearly Emin Alper is a name to watch out for.
 







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