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INDY MOVIE REVIEW
 

Stray Dogs (2013)
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Journey to the West (2014)
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Stray Dogs (2013)

Director:Tsai Ming-liang Producer:Vincent Wang Screenplay by:Peng Fei , Tsai Ming-liang, Tung Cheng Yu

Cinematography:Liao Pen-jung  Edited by:Lei Chen-ching Running time:138 minutes , Lu Ching-hsin, Shong Woon-chong

Country:Taiwan Language:Mandarin Genre:Drama  Subtitle:English  Starring: Lee Kang-sheng – father, Lu Yi-ching – woman,
Chen Shiang-chyi – woman
, Yang Kuei-mei – woman, Lee Yi-cheng – Yi-cheng, son, Lee Yi-chieh – Yi-chieh, daughter, Wu Jin-kai – Wang


Journey to the West (2014)

Director: Tsai Ming-liang Producer:Frédéric Bellaïche, Vincent Wang Story by:Wu Ch''eng-En(novel) Screenplay by:Tsai Ming-liang  Music by:Sébastien Mauro Cinematography:Antoine Héberlé Edited by:Chen-Ching Lei Running time:56min 

Country:France, Taiwan Language:None Genre: Arthouse, Documentary Subtitle:繵ͧ

Starring: Kang-sheng Lee ... Monk, Denis Lavant ... Dragon

 
 

 


˹ѧҧ: Stray Dogs (2013)

ԧ§’ ѺǵšҾ¹

(ԡٻʹٻ˭ ʡ͡պ١ʹٻ)

 ˹ѧ Journey to the west   EXTRAS ͧ蹴մ

ҧ: Stray Dogs (2013) 14 wins & 20 nominations.

 

 

Asia-Pacific Film Festival 2013

Won
Best Actor
Kang-sheng Lee 
Won
Best Sound
Duu-Chih Tu 
Li Chi Kuo 
Nominated
Best Cinematography
Pen-Jung Liao 
Woon-Chong Shong 
Nominated
Best Director
Ming-liang Tsai 
Nominated
Best Film
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Asian Film Awards 2014

Nominated
Asian Film Award
Best Film
Best Director
Ming-liang Tsai 
Best Actor
Kang-sheng Lee 
Best Cinematographer
Pen-Jung Liao 
Woon-Chong Shong 
Ching-Hsin Lu 
 

Black Movie Film Festival 2014

Nominated
Audience Award
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Chicago International Film Festival 2013

Nominated
Gold Hugo
Best Feature
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Chinese Film Media Awards 2015

Nominated
China Film Media Award
Best Director
Ming-liang Tsai 
Best Actor
Kang-sheng Lee 
 

Dubai International Film Festival 2013

Won
Muhr AsiaAfrica Award
Best Director - Feature
Ming-liang Tsai 
Nominated
Muhr AsiaAfrica Award
Best Film - Feature
Vincent Wang 
 

Golden Horse Film Festival 2013

Won
Golden Horse Award
Best Director
Ming-liang Tsai 
Best Leading Actor
Kang-sheng Lee 
Nominated
Golden Horse Award
Best Feature Film
Best Cinematography
Pen-Jung Liao 
Woon-Chong Shong 
Best Sound Effects
Duu-Chih Tu 
Li Chi Kuo 
 

Indiewire Critics'' Poll 2013

Won
ICP Award
Best Undistributed Film
 

International Cinephile Society Awards 2015

Nominated
ICS Award
Best Film Not in the English Language
9th place.
 

International Cinephile Society Awards 2014

Won
ICS Award
Best Picture Not Released in 2013
 

National Society of Film Critics Awards, USA 2014

Won
NSFC Award
Best Film Still Awaiting American Distribution
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Sarasota Film Festival 2014

Nominated
Jury Prize
Narrative Feature Competition Winner
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Seville European Film Festival 2013

Won
Best Director
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Taipei Film Festival 2014

Won
Festival Prize
Best Actor
Kang-sheng Lee 

With tremendous emotional strength derived from the actor''s life experience, Lee''s performance ... More

Nominated
Festival Prize
Best Narrative Feature
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival 2013

Won
Special Jury Prize
Ming-liang Tsai 
Nominated
Grand Prize
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Venice Film Festival 2013

Won
Golden Mouse - Special Mention
Ming-liang Tsai 
Won
Grand Special Jury Prize
Ming-liang Tsai 
Nominated
Golden Lion
Ming-liang Tsai 
 

Village Voice Film Poll 2013

Won
VVFP Award
Best Undistributed Film
 
 

Stray Dogs (2013)
Stray Dogs (Chinese: ˈ郊遊, French: Les Chiens errants) is a 2013 Taiwanese-French drama film. It was written and directed by Tsai Ming-liang and starred Lee Kang-sheng.

A man and his two young children, a boy and a girl, are homeless in Taipei. During the day, the father has a job holding up signs advertising real estate. The children spend their time wandering around stores and the countryside. The family meets at night to wash in public bathrooms and sleep in abandoned buildings. At various times, they are joined by a woman.

User Reviews

A painfully slow and beautiful film

10 May 2016 | by willwoodmill (United States)
The modern film world is one filled with excess, and I''m not just talking about manufactured Hollywood block-busters. No there is even a large amount of excess in films that are more "artistic" if you will. And I want to be clear, that is not necessarily a bad thing, several films recent films have done wonders with just the concept of excess beyond reason, like The Wolf of Wall Street for example. But I do feel like something has been lost in the film world, a certain subtly that filled the films of Bergman and Ozu. A restraint that served to exemplify the characters and their struggles. Luckily there are some contemporary directors that are trying to continue this subtlety, and one of those directors is Ming-Liang Tsai.

Stray Dogs is the most recent film by Ming-Liang Tsai, and well Stray Dogs doesn''t have a plot, at least not the conventional sense. The film instead follows the lives of a few different characters, and tries to capture them as they are. The film brings the audience close to these characters and let''s the audience understand them for what they are. To say that Stray Dogs takes its time is an understatement, every single scene in the film is slow and is stretched to the very limit of filmmaking. And believe me when I say that the scenes are at their limits. There are two scenes in the film that go on for so long that it exceeded not only anything else I had seen in any film, but they exceeded anything I thought possible. There is something very hypnotic about these scenes, Ming-Liang Tsai forces the audience to just stare at these characters for minutes on end as we soak in their facial expressions and slowly become one with them. It is something that is truly gorgeous and needs to be seen to be understood.

If the actors in Stray Dogs were bad or even just average the film would be completely unwatchable, but luckily for us they are all fantastic. Especially Kang-sheng Lee, who plays the father of a small homeless family. (Kang-sheng Lee worked with Ming Liang-Tsai on several of his films.) He gives one of the most enduring and real performances I have ever seen. Another thing that''s needs to be great for the film to work is the cinematography, which is also fantastic. The film is shot in a very matter-of-fact way, things are just shown as they are. The camera only a moves a handful amount of times in a film that''s over two hours long. And the colors and lighting are just wonderful. Overall Stray Dogs is one of the most refreshing films I''ve seen in a long time, and if you think you can handle a really, really slow paced film, with a very unconventional narrative structure. I would highly recommend Stray Dogs.


 

Journey to the West (2014)

Tsai Ming-liang returns with this latest entry in his Walker series, in which his monk acquires an unexpected acolyte in the form of Denis Lavant as he makes his way through the streets of a sun-dappled Marseille.

User Reviews

A meditative piece of art that questions the motion in motion picture.

23 January 2015 | by Sergeant_Tibbs (Suffolk, England)
Sometimes minimalism irks me. Sometimes it gets me. Journey To The West gets me. It offers no discernible dialogue or plot, instead it''s a 50 minute meditative art piece wherein Holy Motors'' Denis Levant meditates and a monk walks very, very slowly, often in public. Without doing much at all, it''s hilarious, infuriating, profound, poetic, and utterly brilliant. I haven''t seen any of Tsai Ming-liang''s other films yet so I don''t have any context but this works on its own. Like Chris Marker with La Jetee before him, Journey To The West questions the motion in motion picture. It questions the ambiguities of life - ideas of motivation, drive, purpose, relief, but also cinematically in the sense of conventional setup and payoffs and journeys. Above all, it''s a film that revels in the tranquility of the moment (or not so tranquil), and while it''s surreal in mood it feels utterly real, refreshing and revealing of the human condition.

Granted, the film definitely tests the boundaries of tedium, and if it were any longer I probably wouldn''t have tolerated it as much, but instead Ming-liang is restrained and economic with all his dozen or so shots. Scenes like watching the monk climb slowly down a subway staircase for 15 minutes bleeds so much life. It''s pure meditative cinema, stripped down but honest. Other shots are almost a case of Where''s Wally in finding the monk among the crowd. It''s delightfully entertaining and makes you think about cinema can do. Self-aware moments certainly confirm that Ming-liang isn''t ignoring the audience. I can''t tell whether he''s is truly pretentious or laughing at us with this, but it works on so many levels. It holds a tense and quirky atmosphere that''s interesting and strangely poignant, yet quietly exuberant. Helps that it''s such a rich aesthetic experience with its gorgeous cinematography and dense sound design. I understand why many find the film hallow but this is a rich tapestry for me.








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