[ REVIEW ]

INDY MOVIE REVIEW
 
Jauja (2014)
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Director:Lisandro Alonso Producer:Ilse Hughan , Andy Kleinman, Viggo Mortensen, Sylvie Pialat, Jaime Romandia, Helle Ulsteen

Screenplay by:Fabian Casas  Music by:Viggo Mortensen Cinematography:Timo Salminen  , Lisandro Alonso

Edited by:Gonzalo del Val Country:Denmark, Argentina, France, Mexico, Netherlands, United States , Natalia López

Language:Danish Running time:1h 49min Genre:Drama, Western  Subtitle:English  , Spanish, French

Starring:Viggo Mortensen as Gunnar Dinesen , Ghita Nørby, Viilbjørk Malling Agger, Adrian Fondari, Esteban Bigliardi, Brian Patterson

 
 

 


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Argentinean Film Critics Association Awards 2015

Won
Silver Condor
Best Cinematography (Mejor Fotografía)
Timo Salminen 
Nominated
Silver Condor
Best Film (Mejor Película)
Lisandro Alonso (director) 
Best Director (Mejor Director)
Lisandro Alonso 
Best Costume Design (Mejor Vestuario)
Gabriela Fernandez 
Best Art Direction (Mejor Dirección Artística)
Sebastián Rosés 
 

Cannes Film Festival 2014

Won
FIPRESCI Prize
Un Certain Regard
Lisandro Alonso 
Nominated
Un Certain Regard Award
Lisandro Alonso 
 

Ghent International Film Festival 2014

Won
Special Mention
Lisandro Alonso (director) 
Nominated
Grand Prix
Best Film
 

Huelva Latin American Film Festival 2014

Won
Silver Colon
Best Cinematography (Mejor Fotografía)
Timo Salminen 
 

International Cinephile Society Awards 2016

Nominated
ICS Award
Best Film Not in the English Language
5th place.
Best Cinematography
Timo Salminen 
 

Premios Fénix (Fenix Film Awards) 2014

Won
Premio Fénix
Best Actor
Viggo Mortensen 
Nominated
Premio Fénix
Best Film
Best Director
Lisandro Alonso 
Best Screenplay
Lisandro Alonso 
Fabian Casas 
Best Cinematography
Timo Salminen 
Best Costume Design
Gabriela Aurora Fernandez 
Best Sound
Catriel Vildosola 
Carlos Cortés Navarrete 
Best Music
Viggo Mortensen 
Buckethead 
Best Editing
Gonzalo del Val 
Natalia López 
 

Rotterdam International Film Festival 2015

Nominated
Big Screen Award
Lisandro Alonso 
Nominated
KNF Award
Lisandro Alonso 
 
 



Jauja is a 2014 internationally co-produced historical drama film directed by Lisandro Alonso. It competed in the Un Certain Regard section at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival[2][3] where it won the FIPRESCI Prize.[4]

Plot[edit]
In the 1880s, Danish Captain Gunnar Dinesen (Viggo Mortensen) is in Argentina with his teenage daughter Ingeborg (Viilbjørk Malling Agger) who asks him if she can have a dog. He is propositioned by Lieutenant Pittaluga (Adrián Fondari) who asks him for permission to take Inge to a dance in exchange for one of his horses. In clumsy Spanish Dinesen refuses, stating that Inge is his daughter. When Dinesen warns Inge that Pittaluga is too fond of young girls and she should not go near him, she asks why she ever would.

Unbeknownst to her father, Inge is already involved with a young soldier named Corto. Corto tells Pattaluga and Dinesen about the rumors that Zuluaga, an officer who inexplicably disappeared into the desert, is leading a group of bandits and wearing a woman''s dress. The men tell Corto to go into the desert and bring them something tangible as proof that Zuluaga is still alive.

During the night Inge and Corto run off together. Though Pattaluga offers to help retrieve Inge, Dinesen insists on going alone. Heading out into the desert he eventually encounters a slain man whispering the name Zuluaga. He later finds a bloodied and dying Corto and asks him where his daughter is before beheading him.

Corto appears to have been attacked by some indigenous people wearing white mud. While Dinesen is stooped over Corto, his horse, hat, and rifle are stolen by one of the natives and Dinesen is forced continue on foot through the inhospitable desert. Driven onward in the search for his daughter, he continues on in the direction the indigenous man went. Dinesen contends with extreme thirst and possibly begins to hallucinate.

As Dinesen wanders through the desert, he sees a dog who leads him first to a toy soldier belonging to Inge and then to a Danish-speaking elderly woman who lives in a cave. She tells him her husband died of a snake bite. Captain Dinesen tells the woman that he is looking for his daughter and, as the conversation unfolds, it is gradually revealed that the woman is his daughter. She tells him to come back whenever he likes and he wanders out into the desert again.

In the present day, a young girl (also played by Viilbjørk Malling Agger) wakes up in a mansion in Denmark and goes to see her dogs. She is distressed by the fact that one dog has been scratching his fur off and the hound-keeper tells her it is because he is nervous and perplexed by her long absences. The girl takes the dog for a walk in the woods around her home and finds a toy soldier on the ground. She picks it up and casts it into a pond.

 

The voice of the desert
10/10
Author: birthdaynoodle from garbanzo
4 January 2015
I went to see director Lisandro Alonso''s ''Jauja'' especially because his earlier trilogy blew me away. ''La Libertad'' (2001), ''Los Muertos'' (2004) and ''Fantasma'' (2006) each observe a solitary man – a survivor – roaming through the jungle wordlessly, like a wild animal. (The setting of ''Fantasma'' is urban, but can also metaphorically be regarded as a jungle.) A decade later, I am still amazed by the power of those films and by how little they rely on plot, dialogue or props. Alonso''s 2008 effort, ''Liverpool'', is also minimalist and follows a similar theme, but tells a slightly more specific story.

''Jauja'' is more elaborate than any of Alonso''s previous work. As in ''Liverpool'', there is something like a plot and very limited, but significant dialogue (in Spanish, Danish and French, in this case). A gorgeous, more sophisticated cinematography presents landscapes that bring to mind 19th Century oil paintings. This is a period film that involves realistic costumes and the kind of beautifully crafted tools used by explorers and the military in the 1800s. Also, ''Jauja'' features a famous actor, Viggo Mortensen of ''The Lord of the Rings'', who co-produced it and co-wrote the musical score. I think this was all a great way for Alonso to try something new and fresh, without giving up his very unique style and aesthetics.

Don''t expect a linear, mainstream film or you may be disappointed. This is an art-house Western – a strange, slow-paced ride through the vast, open space of the Argentine Patagonia. It addresses the exhilarating sense of adventure, but also of violence and dread, that one might experience in the hinterland. The story reminds me of Joseph Conrad''s ''Heart of Darkness'', in that it depicts a struggle between the forces of "civilization" and the primitive, while also drawing a parallel between the wilderness of outdoor nature and our subconscious. (Alonso''s film ''Los Muertos'', which shows a man travelling along a river, may also have a link to Conrad''s short novel.) The film''s tempo, surreal situations and the use of places as a reference to states of mind are reminiscent of Tarkovsky''s ''Stalker'' or ''Solaris''.

We are explained that "Jauja" is a mythical land of abundance, something akin to paradise, whose search in the old days drove many to ruin. Dinesen (Mortensen) aims to establish order in a distant, foreign land, but keeps running into unruly behavior, left and right. It''s as if the indomitable spirit of the desert possessed everyone around him and suggested to him – with its dreamy voice, sometimes forcefully, sometimes playfully – that his stubbornly controlling approach towards life is misguided, a lost cause. Perhaps more than in any other film he''s made, the director achieves communicating something magical and ethereal, pointing to the deep, enigmatic wisdom that we each hold inside, but are afraid to listen to. The ending may imply that all these characters are, in fact, interconnected, showing different sides of the same stone (much like the "animus" and "anima" in Jungian psychology describe the male and female aspects in every person, for example).

Like Alonso''s earlier trilogy, ''Jauja'' poetically hints at the magnificence and mystery of human life in God''s garden. Its images and sounds seem to come from far, far away, yet somehow feel eerily familiar and close.

 

 







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