[ REVIEW ]

INDY MOVIE REVIEW
 
Sister (2012)
 (บรรยาย »ͧ)
 
   
 

Director:Ursula Meier Screenplay by:Antoine Jaccoud, Ursula Meier Cinematography:Agnès Godard 

Running time:97 min Country:Switzerland Language:French English Genre:Crime, Drama  Subtitle:English/ 

Starring: Léa Seydoux as Louise, Kacey Mottet Klein as Simon, Gillian Anderson as Kristin Jansen, Martin Compston as Mike,
Jean-François Stévenin as Cook
, Yann Trégouët as Bruno, Gabin Lefebvre as Marcus,
Dilon Ademi as Dilon
, Magne-Håvard Brekke, Johan Libéreau

 

 

 


หนังตัวอย่าง:

 


รางวัล: 9 wins & 6 nominations.

 

 

Art Film Festival 2012

Nominated
Blue Angel
Best Film
Ursula Meier 
 

Athens International Film Festival 2012

Won
Golden Athena
Best Picture
Ursula Meier 
 

Berlin International Film Festival 2012

Won
Silver Berlin Bear
Special Award
Ursula Meier 
Nominated
Golden Berlin Bear
Ursula Meier 
 

Buster International Children''s Film Festival 2012

Won
Best Buster Award
Nordisk Film Foundation''s Best Child Actor
Kacey Mottet Klein 
Danish Film Directors'' Best Film for Children
Ursula Meier 
 

Cabourg Romantic Film Festival 2012

Won
Best Actress
Léa Seydoux 
For 
Les adieux à la reine
 

César Awards, France 2013

Nominated
César
Most Promising Actor (Meilleur espoir masculin)
Kacey Mottet Klein 
 

European Film Awards 2012

Nominated
Young Audience Award
Ursula Meier 
 

Hawaii International Film Festival 2012

Won
EuroCinema Hawai''i Award
Best Actor
Kacey Mottet Klein 
Nominated
EuroCinema Hawai''i Award
Best Film
Ursula Meier 
 

Independent Spirit Awards 2013

Nominated
Independent Spirit Award
Best International Film
Ursula Meier 
Switzerland
 

Swiss Film Prize 2013

Won
Swiss Film Prize
Best Film (Bester Spielfilm)
Ursula Meier 
Best Actor (Bester Darsteller)
Kacey Mottet Klein 
Best Screenplay (Bestes Drehbuch)
Ursula Meier 
Antoine Jaccoud 
 
 

Sister (French: L''Enfant d''en haut) is a 2012 Swiss drama film directed by Ursula Meier. The film competed in competition at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival,where it won the Special Award, the Silver Bear.

The film was selected as the Swiss entry for the Best Foreign Language Oscar at the 85th Academy Awards, making the January shortlist.


Brilliant, disturbing

8 October 2012 | by Dan Franzen (dfranzen70) (United States)
In Sister, a boy helps he and his sister survive by stealing from rich folks at a posh ski resort in the Swiss Alps. But the boy and his sister are both a bit more than each seems in this provocative psychological, daring thriller from Ursula Meier.

Young Simon (Kacey Mottet Klein) has procured a season pass to a winter ski lodge. Each day, he rides up the giant lifts to the top of the mountain, where he swipes skis, poles, boots, gloves, and other paraphernalia, selling them to the less-fortunate in the town below. He does this to support he and his sister Louise (Lea Seydoux), an unfocused, somewhat-selfish wanderer who appears too have little concern for the well being of herself or for Simon, flitting from job to job and from lover to lover like a forlorn mosquito. So it''s entirely up to Simon to keep them afloat, and he''s a quick learner. Even at age 12, he can cook and clean and knows ski equipment better than even expert skiers, even though he is no skier himself. He''s an entrepreneur, albeit in a dangerous career.

He sells to workers. He sells to kids. He takes advance orders and knows how much to charge. He''s not intimidated by anyone. He is, at his tender age, a master thief, knowing where to stow his ill-gotten gains and how best to get them back down the mountain. One can argue that he does what he has to do, since his youth prevents him from getting an authentic job and the adult in the family is wildly undependable. He takes on an apprentice at one point, goes into cahoots with another at a different juncture. But a few of his schemes do not end favorably for him.

Simon is friendless, utterly alone. But his relationship with Louise is quite complicated. There are tender touches. Inappropriate remarks. Lingering glances. Is this simply typical preteen behavior, or something more? With no other friends - and apparently, no school to serve as a social function - Louise is about the only female with whom he interacts on a regular basis.

He meets a visiting family - mom, two boys - at the resort. Mom is kind and buys Simon breakfast, even though he is loaded with cash. They bond a little; she seeing perhaps a lost soul whose story of no parents or siblings isn''t ringing true, he seeing a mother figure he desperately desires.

The twist in the movie makes its appearance just about halfway through. It''s surprising that it arrives so early, and when it does it passes two crucial tests: it is both out of the blue and completely plausible. The perfect twist.

Obviously, the twist coming so early in the film means that the movie''s real enticement comes in this major revelation - well, a revelation to the audience, not to the characters. At first, we''re not sure who is telling the truth; are we being snookered? When we discover the answer to that question, the relationship between Louise and Simon takes on a whole new dimension.

Both Klein and Seydoux, playing characters who are almost aggressively opposite from one another, are phenomenal. Simon longs for a better life even as he excels in his current role. Louise, a tragic heroine, is mentally scarred, unsure, unhappy, and besieged by doubt. She seems of no use to him, and yet he pushes hard to make a life for them both.

The ending is one of those that will leave half of the audience wondering if a reel was left off by mistake and the other half nodding appreciatively. It is not a neat ending; it is awash with symbolism of the direction each lead''s life is headed. And set against the majestic beauty of the mountains, it is a strong, stark, and beautiful finale.



 

 





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