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Cochochi (2007)
 (บรรยายอังกฤษ) 
 
   
 

Director:Israel Cárdenas, Laura Amelia Guzmán Producer:Pablo Cruz, Donald Ranvaud

Screenplay by:Israel Cárdenas, Laura Amelia Guzmán Music by:Israel Cárdenas  

Cinematography:Israel Cárdenas, Laura Amelia Guzmán  Edited by:Yibran Asuad, Israel Cárdenas, Laura Amelia Guzmán

Running time:1h 27min Country:Mexico | UK | Canada Language:Tarahumara Genre:Family  Subtitle:English 

Starring: Antonio Lerma Batista ... Tony, Evaristo Lerma Batista ... Evaristo

 
 
     Evaristo and Luis Antonio - indigenous brothers from the SierraTarahumara in northwest Mexico - have just graduated from boarding elementary school. Evaristo desires to continue his education, leading a bicultural life, where the Tarahumara, or Raramuri as they call themselves, have the opportunity to keep learning to speak, read and write in Spanish, the Mexican official language. Meanwhile Luis Antonio "Tony" is very happy to be done with school. Even though he is a smart kid and has won a grant to move on to high school, he prefers to live life in the ranch, where the kids grow up at a very young age. One morning the brothers are sent to deliver some medicine to a far away community. Tony asks their grandfather for permission to take his horse but the answer is no. Nevertheless, he decides to take it, even if Evaristo is not convinced. They take a wrong path that leads them to a narrow and deep canyon. The horse cannot go on so the boys tie it around a tree. When they come back for it the horse is no longer there. Both, angry and worried, walk in the forest looking for it; Tony thinks the horse was stolen while Evaristo is worried about the assignment. Arguing about this, they suddenly lose each other. Now each on their own continue the journey separately; Tony looks for the horse and ends up at an amusing party, while Evaristo is lonely in the canyons looking for the place to deliver the medicine. The trip becomes longer than expected. They can''t go back without the horse.
- Written by Venice Film Festival

หนังตัวอย่าง:

รางวัล:9 wins & 2 nominations.

 

 

Buenos Aires International Festival of Independent Cinema 2008

Won
SIGNIS Award - Special Mention
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
Nominated
Best Film
Israel Cárdenas 
 

Gijón International Film Festival 2007

Won
FIPRESCI Prize
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
 

Gramado Film Festival 2008

Won
Golden Kikito
Latin Film Competiton - Best Film (Longa Metragem em 35mm, Latinos - Melhor Filme)
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
Latin Film Competiton - Excellency of Technique Language (Longa Metragem em 35mm, Latinos - Excelência de Linguagem Técnica)
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
Latin Film Competiton - Prize of Artistic Quality (Longa Metragem em 35mm, Latinos - Prêmio de Qualidade Artística)
 

Jeonju Film Festival 2008

Nominated
Woosuk Award
International Competition
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
Israel Cárdenas 
 

Miami Film Festival 2008

Won
Grand Jury Prize
Dramatic Features - Ibero-American Cinema Competition
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
 

Toronto International Film Festival 2007

Won
Discovery Award
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
 

Toulouse Latin America Film Festival 2008

Won
FIPRESCI Prize
First Feature Film
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
Won
Grand Prix
Best Film
Israel Cárdenas 
Laura Amelia Guzmán 
 
 

Combining endlessly charming performances by real-life / Cine Vegas
9/10
Author: juan1902 from Mexico
22 September 2008

Combining endlessly charming performances by real-life brothers Evaristo and Antonio Lerma Batista with beautiful Tarahumara landscapes, COCHOCHI captures a simpler world seemingly unaffected by modern times.

One young Tarahumara brother is thrilled to be in elementary school and learning new subjects in Spanish. The other wants to drop out and return to the family ranch, where traditional Tarahumara ways prevail. When their grandfather asks them to take medicine across the mountains to another town on his horse, the brothers lose the horse and then each other, setting them off on different adventures through Sierra Tarahumara communities.

The brothers Batista turn in realistic and intelligent performances that break the clichés of child actors, which lend the film itself an undeniable realism. Through this story of two brothers, debut directors Israel Cárdenas and Laura Amelia Guzmán make an engaging film that, in spite of its modest means, records an indigenous community under change without the critical eye of outside analysis.

Coming of Age in the Sierra By Pamela Biénzobas Saffie

10/10
Author: peter-2941 from Mexico
22 September 2008

Children growing up and becoming responsible teenagers (or not); boys being rebellious or obedient, shyly joking about girls, liking or running away from school; defying authority and doing what they are not supposed to, and then having to assume responsibility. The story, as universal as a coming-of-age story can be, is that of Cochochi, the remarkable first feature by Laura Amelia Guzmán and Israel Cárdenas.

The tone is also universal and natural, but there is one particular detail that sets it apart from your usual teen flick: it is set in the Tarahumara Sierra, a rural zone of Chihuahua, Mexico, among the indigenous Raramuri people. But this is not what makes it most special. It''s the fact that it tells this story without the slightest hint of exoticism or condescendence, and through a gaze that feels authentic, honest and dignified.

Evaristo and Luis Antonio ("Tony") Lerma Torres — the names of the characters and of the actors — are two brothers finishing elementary school. Evaristo loves studying, unlike Tony who, nevertheless, does so well that he gets a scholarship to continue his education, though he doesn''t even attend their graduation ceremony. (The reason he gives for his absence towards the end is delightful.) When they''re sent out to deliver some medicine to relatives in another town, Tony decides to take their grandfather''s horse, though they are not allowed to. In the middle of the journey, they lose the horse and then lose each other. Each one goes through his own adventures during the separate search, which takes both through other towns and new encounters. When they finally find each other they have to assume their responsibility, understanding how important the horse is for their family''s subsistence, and they must also decide about what they want to do next with their lives: study or work the earth.

Though at some point in their separate journeys the rhythm seems to stretch things out slightly, the film''s overall structure is very precise and quickly seduces without much effort. The use of music is also very accurate, to transmit not just the atmosphere, but often to set the beat of the action. The cinematography, by Guzmán and Cárdenas, reaches a delicate balance between boasting the awesome beauty of the landscape and avoiding the postcard image. The environment''s greatness participates in the story, not just as a backdrop but as a determining feature, and it is photographed accordingly.

The outstanding quality of Cochochi and its respectful tone implicitly questions an attitude that concerns all domains, and cinema in one of the first instances since, by using nature, it involves both looking at and portraying (a person, a group, a reality, a concept...) The camera indicates a position in relation to the subject, which is way too often one of superiority when that subject is a minority or underprivileged community. Even with the best intentions, the approach is usually patronizing, looking at the other through its difference or novelty.

Cochochi''s approach is so natural that of course it highlights the difference, precisely by incorporating it as a normal part of another kind of everyday reality. The coexistence of Raramuri and Spanish languages, the use of the radio to send out both private and practical messages to other towns, the material difficulties, the ways of relating to strangers so differently to that of the city and other particularities of life in the Sierra are simply integrated into the story, the storytelling and the image.

This all contributes to making Cochochi a fine piece of film-making, accurately shot and built; a lovely, fun and moving story about children, and an (unfortunately) exceptional example of love and respect for the subject.

Amazing Film!

10/10
Author: fulene from Oklahoma, USA
31 December 2014

Having lived in the Sierra Tarahumara for ten years, I can say that this is the most sensitive, authentic, portrayal of life there, among the Raramuri, that I have ever seen. The verbal communication is 100% authentic, as is the pace of the film. It doesn''t surprise me that all the reviewers don''t "get" this movie. I applaud the makers of this remarkable film for its complete honesty and accuracy. I don''t know how they achieved the subtleties in this portrayal unless they had spent a great deal of time there. Seeing the film put me right back there. In fact I think much of it was shot near my Rancho. It makes me long to go back and be with my Raramuri friends but watching it is just like being there. This film is a look into Raramuri life without any agenda on the part of the filmmakers. Absolutely wonderful!
 




เข้าชม : 1848    [ ขึ้นบน ]
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