[ REVIEW ]

INDY MOVIE REVIEW
 
Enter the Void (2009)
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Director:Gaspar Noé Producer:Brahim Chioua Screenplay by:Gaspar Noé  Cinematography:Benoît Debie  Edited by: Gaspar Noé, Marc Boucrot, Jérôme Pesnel Running time:143 minutes Country: France Language:English Genre:  Subtitle:English,    Starring: Paz de la Huerta ... Linda, Nathaniel Brown ... Oscar,
Cyril Roy ... Alex
, Olly Alexander ... Victor, Masato Tanno ... Mario, Ed Spear Ed Spear ... Bruno, Emily Alyn Lind ... Little Linda,
Jesse Kuhn ... Little Oscar
, Nobu Imai ... Tito, Sakiko Fukuhara ... Saki, Janice Béliveau-Sicotte ... Mother, Sara Stockbridge ... Suzy,
Stuart Miller ... Victor''s Father
, Emi Takeuchi ... Carol, Rumiko Kimishima ... Rumi
, Vincent Maraval, Olivier Delbosc, Marc Missonnier

 

˹ѧҧ:

ҧ:3 wins & 7 nominations.

 

 

Camerimage 2010

Nominated
Golden Frog
Main Competition
Benoît Debie 
 

Cannes Film Festival 2009

Nominated
Palme d''Or
Gaspar Noé 
 

Indiewire Critics'' Poll 2010

Nominated
ICP Award
Best Director
Gaspar Noé 
5th place.
 

Neuchâtel International Fantasy Film Festival 2010

Won
Narcisse Award
Best Feature Film
Gaspar Noé 
 

Sitges - Catalonian International Film Festival 2009

Won
Best Cinematography
Benoît Debie 
 
Won
Special Prize of the Jury
Gaspar Noé 
Nominated
Best Film
Gaspar Noé 
 

SXSW Film Festival 2010

Nominated
Audience Award
Midnight Audience
Gaspar Noé 
 

Village Voice Film Poll 2010

Nominated
VVFP Award
Best Director
Gaspar Noé 
 

Village Voice Film Poll 2009

3rd place
VVFP Award
Best Undistributed Film

 
 

Enter the Void is a 2009 English-language French drama film written and directed by Gaspar Noé and starring Nathaniel Brown, Paz de la Huerta, and Cyril Roy. Set in the neon-lit nightclub environments of Tokyo, the story follows Oscar, a young American drug dealer who gets shot by the police, but continues to watch subsequent events during an out-of-body experience. The film is shot from a first-person viewpoint, which often floats above the city streets, and occasionally features Oscar staring over his own shoulder as he recalls moments from his past. Noé labels the film a "psychedelic melodrama".

Noé''s dream project for many years, the production was made possible after the commercial success of his previous feature film, Irréversible (2002). Enter the Void was primarily financed by Wild Bunch, while Fidélité Films led the actual production. With a mix of professionals and newcomers, the film makes heavy use of imagery inspired by experimental cinema and psychedelic drug experiences. Principal photography took place on location in Tokyo, and involved many complicated crane shots. Co-producers included the visual effects studio BUF Compagnie, which also provided the computer-generated imagery. The film''s soundtrack is a collage of electronic pop and experimental music.

A rough cut premiered at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival, but post-production work continued, and the film was not released in France until almost a year later. A cut-down version was released in the United States and United Kingdom in September 2010. The critical response was sharply divided: positive reviews described the film as captivating and innovative, while negative critics called it tedious and puerile. The film performed poorly at the box office.

Storyline
Tokyo''s nasty underside, seen primarily through the eyes of Oscar, a heavy drug user, whose sister Linda is a stripper. Oscar also has flashbacks to his childhood when trauma upends the siblings. Oscar''s drug-fed hallucinations alter Tokyo''s already-disconcerting nights, and after the police shoot him, he can float above and look down: on his sister''s sorrow, on the rooms of a love hotel, and on life at even a molecular level. The spectrum''s colors can be beautiful; it''s people''s colorless lives that can be ugly. And what of afterlife, is there more than a void?


User Reviews

The intellectual''s ''Inception'' - a ''Now I''ve seen it all'' death trip back to life

13 December 2010 | by Radu_A (Germany)
So what could I add to what has been stated in the other reviews? Yes, ''Enter the Void'' is definitely a trippy mindbuster, and as such anyone who requires story or frames to enjoy a film should give it a miss. Yes, the visuals are eye-popping and the ubiquitous stroboscope effects may cause severe nausea - I watched it on BR and couldn''t help but thinking what an advantage home entertainment can be over cinema exposure. This is a film which may be best enjoyed alone, somewhat stoned or drunk, and very late at night. And the pause button is definitely a life-saver.

I can sympathize with those who felt tormented by the epic runtime and disparity between the first and second half of the film: the former is sort of a ''last film'' of the protagonist Victor retelling his life, and therefore makes sense plot-wise, the latter is a meandering flow representing his attachment to his sister. It is a bit unfair to discard the film for this reason, though, because the dialogue between Victor and his best friend Alex in the beginning hints at what the nature and culmination of this attachment will be. The interspersed aerial shots of an increasingly CG-rendered Tokyo may actually put this transition into question - this could all very well be part of Victor''s ''death trip''.

What I really liked about ''Enter the Void'' is the setting, for I have lived in Tokyo myself for three years. The area where the story takes place (judging from where the CG puts the Tokyo Tower) should be Roppongi, which is an expat and night club haven; while the CG makes the place appear a bit gaudy, it is indeed populated by a disproportionate number of drop-outs and sleazy bees, and I''ve always wondered why there''s no film about Roppongi yet - contemporary Tokyo is mostly condensed to the Yakuza backdrop of Kabukichô or the juvenile epicenter of Shibuya. So on that note, I appreciate a film about the expat world, as weird and dysfunctional as it may be.

''Enter the Void'' pushes the gates of what film can visually do visually wide open, and therefore shouldn''t be dismissed by any cinephile. But your viewing conditions will be crucial to whether you will love this film or hate it.







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