[ REVIEW ]

INDY MOVIE REVIEW
 
Goodbye to Language (2014)
 (บรรยายอังกฤษ)
 
   
 

Director:Jean-Luc Godard Producer:Alain Sarde, Brahim Chioua, Vincent Maraval Screenplay by:Jean-Luc Godard Cinematography:Fabrice Aragno  Edited by:Jean-Luc Godard, Fabrice Aragno Running time:70 min  

Country:France, Switzerland Language:French, English Genre:Drama Subtitle:English 

Starring: Héloise Godet, Kamel Abdeli, Richard Chevallier, Zoé Bruneau,

 

 

 


หนังตัวอย่าง:

รางวัล: 5 wins & 5 nominations.

 

 

Camerimage 2014

Nominated
Best 3D Feature Film
Fabrice Aragno 
 

Cannes Film Festival 2014

Won
Jury Prize
Jean-Luc Godard 
Ex-aequo with Mommy (2014).
Won
Palm Dog - Jury Prize
Roxy Miéville 
Nominated
Palme d''Or
Jean-Luc Godard 
 

Munich Film Festival 2014

Nominated
ARRI/OSRAM Award
Best International Film
Jean-Luc Godard 
 

National Society of Film Critics Awards, USA 2015

Won
NSFC Award
Best Film
2nd place
NSFC Award
Best Director
Jean-Luc Godard 
3rd place
NSFC Award
Best Cinematography
Fabrice Aragno 
 

Prix Louis Delluc 2014

Nominated
Prix Louis Delluc
Best Film
Jean-Luc Godard (director) 
 

Village Voice Film Poll 2014

Nominated
VVFP Award
Best Film
 
 

Storyline

"The idea is simple: A married woman and a single man meet. They love, they argue, fists fly. A dog strays between town and country. The seasons pass. The man and woman meet again. The dog finds itself between them. The other is in one, the one is in the other and they are three. The former husband shatters everything. A second film begins: the same as the first, and yet not. From the human race we pass to metaphor. This ends in barking and a baby''s cries. In the meantime, we will have seen people talking of the demise of the dollar, of truth in mathematics and of the death of a robin."
Godard in a handwritten synopsis first posted onTwitter

Goodbye to Language (French: Adieu au Langage) is a 2014 French-Swiss 3D experimentalnarrative essay film written and directed by Jean-Luc Godard. It stars Héloise Godet, Kamel Abdeli, Richard Chevallier, Zoé Bruneau and Christian Grégori and was shot by cinematographer Fabrice Aragno. It is Godard''s 39th feature film and 121st film or video project. The film''s title has a double meaning. In the French-speaking parts of Switzerland, the word "adieu" can mean both goodbye and hello. The film depicts a young couple having an affair until the woman''s husband finds out and the man ends up dead. Two pairs of actors portray the young couple and their actions repeat and mirror one another. Godard''s own dog Roxy Miéville has a prominent role in the film and won a prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Like many of Godard''s films it includes numerous quotes and references to previous artistic, philosophical and scientific works, most prominently those of Jacques Ellul, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Mary Shelley.

Godard became interested in making a 3D film in 2010 and asked Aragno to make some camera tests. Aragno was dissatisfied with the results of a professional 3D camera and built his own custom rigs using Canon 5Ds and Flip Minos. Aragno broke many of the standard rules for 3D cinematography, experimenting in production and post-production. Godard and Aragno worked on the film for four years, each shooting footage independently before officially beginning production with the actors. Godard edited a 2D version of the film before he and Aragno perfected the 3D cut with color correction and surround sound.

It premiered in competition at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival and won the Jury Prize. It was later screened at such festivals as the New York Film Festival and the Locarno International Film Festival. It was distributed in France by Wild Bunch and in the US by Kino Lorber and won Best Picture at the 2014 National Society of Film Critics Awards.

The film received many good reviews and was listed as one of the best films of the year by several prominent critics. Some critics praised its visual style while others criticized its plot as "incomprehensible" and called Godard pretentious. David Bordwell said it was the best 3D film that he had ever seen. Bordwell and several other critics have attempted to interpret the film, both through its themes and narrative and for its use of 3D.

Some of the film''s more elaborate shots have been called innovative and new techniques of the film vocabulary. These includes a shot referred to as "separation" in which a single, unbroken shot splits into two separate shots that can be viewed simultaneously through either the left or the right eye, and then returns to one single 3D shot. Aragno and Godard also experimented with double exposure 3D images and shots with parallaxs that are difficult for the human eye to see.



 





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